Teaching Melody

 

At this point your students are understanding the big picture of macro versus micro beat, note subdivisions, and meter, but as we all know there is a lot more to music than that! The addition of a melody, creates a bigger picture of how music works. Blocks are built vertically and horizontally. Isolating just one element at a time can be a very worthwhile practice for students feeling overwhelmed. When students are familiar with playing and singing a range of pitches, Beat Blocks enable students to easily create counter melodies as they made complementary rhythms before. Use solfege blocks to transpose between keys easily or to focus on la-based, do-based, or other tonal centers, or use the note name blocks to identify specific pitches. Students translating their compositions to paper or DAWs can identify the treble or bass clef placements on the backside of the blocks. 

Adding melody to a rhythm

Adding melody to a rhythm

Using note names to create a portable obstinate that can sit on or near the instrument being played.

Board visuals

Board visuals

Put some magnets on the back and display a melody on the board.

Solfege Blocks

Solfege Blocks

Solfege hand symbols

Solfege hand symbols

Solfege blocks reinforce hand signs by including them on the back of the blocks, allowing students a second chance at recognizing the note relationships.

Diatonic Note Names

Diatonic Note Names

Treble clef placement

Treble clef placement

On the back side of the diatonic note set are the treble clef note placements. These are customizable by key or clef as needed for your classroom.

Two measure melody composition

Two measure melody composition

 

Beat

Blocks

Beat Blocks iBook
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since 2/9/16

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